The BEST Gluten-Free Bread (No-Knead!)

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We aren’t kidding when we say this is the BEST gluten-free bread — it really is! It’s crusty on the outside, soft on the inside, fluffy, flavorful, and amazingly versatile. Not only that, but it’s also vegan and there’s no kneading required! Whoa! Isn’t that the BEST!? 

We (of course) encourage you to make all your sandwich dreams come true with this bread, but you can also toast it up for breakfast or use it to make French toast, garlic bread, bread pudding, croutons, and beyond! The sky’s the limit and this bread will take you there! Plus, just 9 ingredients (pantry staples!) and minimal hands-on time required. Let us show you how it’s done! 

How to Make Gluten-Free Bread

If you think making gluten-free bread sounds difficult, it’s time to kick that idea to the curb! When it comes to making bread at home, we’re into the dump, mix, rise, and bake style (a.k.a. super easy!).

This beginner-friendly bread starts with a packet of yeast to make it rise and give it those lovely air pockets. If you’ve never used yeast, don’t worry — it’s easier than you think. Just make sure the water is the right temperature (100 – 110 F / 38-43 C) and be sure to include the sugar, which is essential because it feeds the yeast.

You’ll know it worked if the mixture gets frothy like the photo below. When it’s frothy, we add ground chia seeds as the egg replacement, keeping this recipe friendly for our vegan and egg-free friends. Did we mention it’s also nut-free?

Next up: the gluten-free flours. The magic combo for this recipe is brown rice flour, oat flour, potato starch, and sorghum flour. While the whole grain flours add structure and wholesomeness, the potato starch is key for keeping it light (vs. dense). The final dry ingredient is salt for added flavor!

When the wet and dry ingredients combine, the most lovely, pourable batter forms and is ready for adding to a loaf pan.

After a quick hour (got laundry, anyone?) in a warm spot, the batter doubles in size and is ready to go in the oven.

It starts at a higher temperature to develop a golden-brown crust, then we drop the heat to let it cook fully on the inside without burning.

Just look at that golden-brown beauty!

Lastly, for best texture, we let it cool fully before slicing, and it’s ready to enjoy!

We hope you LOVE this gluten-free bread! It’s:

Crusty on the outside
Spongey on the inside
Light
Flavorful
Versatile
& Easy to prepare!

It’s the answer to all your gluten-free sandwich, French toast, garlic bread, bread pudding, and crouton dreams! And it also pairs beautifully with a bowl of soup (like our 1-Pot Everyday Lentil Soup or Easy 1-Pot Tomato Soup) for an easy weeknight meal.

More “Bready” Gluten-Free Things!

If you try this recipe, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it, and don’t forget to tag a photo #minimalistbaker on Instagram. Cheers, friends!

The BEST Gluten-Free Bread (No-Knead!)

The ultimate gluten-free bread that’s easy to make and vegan too! So light, fluffy, flavorful, and endlessly versatile. Just 9 ingredients required for this show-stopping bread!
Author Minimalist Baker
Print
4.76 from 61 votes
Prep Time 1hour30minutes
Cook Time 1hour15minutes
Total Time 2hours45minutes
Servings 12(Slices)
Course Bread
Cuisine Gluten-Free, Vegan
Freezer Friendly 1 month
Does it keep? 3-4 Days

Ingredients

  • Avocado oil(or other neutral oil // for greasing pan)
  • 2cupswarm water
  • 2Tbsporganic cane sugar
  • 1packetactive dry yeast (we used Red Star // 1 packet yields ~2 ¼ tsp or 7 g)
  • 1/4cupground chia seeds
  • 1cupbrown rice flour(plus more for flouring pan)
  • 3/4cupoat flour(certified gluten-free as needed // if oat-free, you can try subbing additional sorghum flour)
  • 1cuppotato starch
  • 3/4cupsorghum flour
  • 2tspsea salt

Instructions

  • Prepare an 8 x 4-inch (or similar size) loaf pan by greasing it with oil and flouring with brown rice flour.
  • In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the warm water (100-110 degrees F / 38-43 C) and sugar until the sugar is dissolved. Whisk in the packet of yeast and let it bloom on the counter for 10 minutes until frothy. If it doesn’t foam, start over — your water may have been too hot or the packet of yeast was expired.
  • Once the yeast has bloomed, whisk in ground chia seeds and let the mixture gel for about 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together brown rice flour, oat flour, potato starch, sorghum flour, and salt.
  • Add the wet ingredients to the center of the dry and stir together with a wooden spoon. The mixture will be slightly wet, like a thick sticky batter. Make sure to thoroughly mix in and break up any clumps of chia seeds (a whisk can be helpful).
  • Put the batter into your prepared loaf pan and cover it with a clean kitchen towel. Place it in a warm, draft-free area to proof for an hour.
  • Once batter has doubled in size, preheat the oven to 425 F (218 C). Once preheated, bake at 425 F (218 C) for 45 minutes, then turn the oven down to 375 F (190 C) for 30 minutes. Remove the bread from the oven and let it cool in the pan for 10 minutes. Then transfer to a cooling rack to cool completely before cutting into it.
  • Store leftovers in a sealed container at room temperature for up to 3-4 days or in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks. Bread can also be sliced and frozen for up to 1 month.

Video

Notes

*Prep time includes rising.
*Nutrition information is a rough estimate calculated with 1/2 tsp avocado oil for greasing pan.
*Inspired by the Black Olive, Caraway, and Honey Yeast Bread from the lovely Cannelle et Vanille cookbook by Aran Goyoaga.

Nutrition (1 of 12 servings)

Serving: 1sliceCalories: 167Carbohydrates: 35.6gProtein: 2.8gFat: 1.7gSaturated Fat: 0.3gPolyunsaturated Fat: 0.8gMonounsaturated Fat: 0.5gTrans Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 392mgPotassium: 102mgFiber: 2.4gSugar: 2.3gVitamin A: 0IUVitamin C: 0mgCalcium: 19mgIron: 1mg

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Reader Interactions

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  1. Katysays

    I’ve made this successfully a couple of times now! The most recent one today, I subbed in chickpea flour for the sorghum flour (didn’t have any) and used 2 tbsp ground flaxseed + 2 tsp psyllium husk in place of the 4 tbsp ground chia seed (also didn’t have any). I find that psyllium helps give GF bread the “chew” that I’m used to, coming from regular bread baking. Both swaps worked beautifully. I have noticed that I never need the full baking time – I typically do about 30 min at 425, then about 15-20 min at 375 with foil tented over it to prevent the top from getting too dark. All told, this is a GREAT allergy-friendly recipe that I will be making repeatedly!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Thank you for sharing, Katy! We’re so glad you’re enjoying the recipe and have found some great swaps! xo

      Reply
  2. Ilona K Cappellsays

    Hi,
    Can’t have sorghum flour. Can it be substituted in this recipe?
    Thanks.

    Reply
  3. Jessicasays

    I admit I subbed some of the flours….I used brown rice flour but used Teff, Almond and Arrowroot instead of the ones you used…but I don’t think that would have affected the rise and this bread did not rise much in the oven. I wonder if the absence of baking powder or baking soda/apple cider vinegar is the reason why? Curious why you didn’t use any in your recipe.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Jessica, the types of flours can make a big difference in terms of rise. Potato starch is key for making it light and fluffy. Or we wonder if your yeast was expired or didn’t activate? A leavening agent isn’t necessary because of the yeast.

      Reply
  4. Yanasays

    I have now made this bread over a dozen times for my family and each time it comes out perfectly, no modifications. My kiddo I allergic to milk and eggs and I am gluten free so this bread satisfies everyone. My kid will even eat it plain, it’s that good. Thank you for creating such healthy and awesome recipes.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Aw, this makes us SO happy to hear, Yana! We’re so glad you and your family enjoy it! xoxo

      Reply
  5. Sandrasays

    Out of all the GF breads I’ve baked, this is by far the best. It is also such an easy recipe to follow if you have all the ingredients. I’ve measured in cups and weighed ingredients and found both work just as well. I’ve learned to bake it a lower temperature 375 so it doesn’t get too hard and crunchy.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Thanks so much for sharing your experience, Sandra! So glad you’re enjoying this bread!

      Reply
  6. Kate in the UKsays

    I have made this twice now but both times it has not really been edible! Lol! I am in the UK and we don’t use “cups” as measures… I did Google how many ounces a cup is, but 1st time mixture impossibly DRY so i added water and it was kinda OK (bit like a brick!) 2nd time I used a much smaller cup to measure and it was VERY wet. When cooked I ended up with a white layer on the bottom and brown on top. The brown on top was raw but also burnt! Also tastes very salty…. I will watch your “help” tutorial but do any suggestions spring to mind?
    Kate in UK

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Kate! Sorry to hear this hasn’t been working for you! Above the ingredients list it says “US Customary – Metric“, if you click metric it should show you the ingredient amounts in grams/mls. That could be part of the issue, but we’re also curious if you made any ingredient substitutions at all? It is also a somewhat dense and moist bread by nature, especially compared to glutinous bread!

      Reply
  7. Hadleysays

    I used this as the basis for my family’s go-to personalized gluten free bread recipe! It’s so good!! Makes the best sandwiches! And so easy to make.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Whoop! We’re so glad to hear it, Hadley! Thank you for the lovely review! xo

      Reply
  8. Sophie Bsays

    By far the best and easiest gluten free bread I’ve made. I’ve tried so many that were the wrong texture or complete flops. This one is as a good as a regular bread. Mine turned out firm and reminded me of my childhood pumpernickel bread. Thank you for the this great recipe!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Yay! Thanks so much for the lovely review, Sophie. So glad you enjoyed the bread!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re sorry to hear that, Ezra! Did you make any modifications? Could you tell us a little more about what went wrong? We’d love to help troubleshoot, if possible!

      Reply
      • Katesays

        Made this twice now for my gf mum. So yummy that the rest of the family tucked in! Make sure you dust the tin well with flour. I used a loaf liner, and it stuck to the paper, even though I oiled and dusted. Next time I might try without the liner.

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Thanks so much for sharing your experience, Kate. So glad everyone was still able to enjoy the bread!

          Reply
  9. Kristensays

    Just starting on gf diet for my son and they recommended no oats initially. Has anyone tried the sorghum flour substitute for the oat flour?

    Reply
  10. Rianne57says

    Can I substitute another flous for sorghum? Like brown rice flour? I just can’t go out and buy yet another pound (or two or three) of yet another kind of flour! I am fairly new at this and prices are so high that just buying food right now on a fixed income is difficult.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Rianne, we haven’t tested with other flours in place of the sorghum, so can’t guarantee it will turn out the same. But the next best option would be more oat flour. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  11. Michellesays

    This is the best gluten-free bread I have ever made. I will be making this often. This bread is perfect for sandwiches as well as just by itself. I used honey instead of organic sugar. My dough was a little thick so I added a few tablespoons of water to thin it so it was a little more pourable. It came out perfect. Thank you for your delicious recipes!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Aw, yay! We’re so glad it came out so well. Thank you for the lovely review, Michelle! xo

      Reply
  12. Abbysays

    Another amazing recipe! Thank you! After going plant based a couple years ago, we discovered our little girl has celiac’s disease which threw another curve into relearning how to cook. Your recipes never disappoint; we even serve them to our non vegan friends with great success!

    I did bake this at 400° for the first 45 and then 375°, with foil over for 25 minutes and it’s perfect. Not vegan, but adding 2tbs of honey to the wet ingredients before mixing with the dry makes it taste just like mom’s homemade honey wheat bread from when I was a kid.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Aw, we’re so glad you enjoyed the recipe and that your little girl gets to have it too =) Thank you for sharing, Abby! xo

      Reply
  13. Sallysays

    I have made this recipe about 5 times now and love it. It’s quite forgiving. Now make it and give as a gift to friends. Thanks

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Love this! Thanks so much for the wonderful review, Sally. So glad you’re enjoying this recipe!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Kristen, We haven’t tried this with eggs yet but we think it would work to use 1 egg in place of the chia. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
      • Kristensays

        I did try with an egg i/o chia, and as far as I know (1st time making bread) it was a fine substitute. I also had to sub teff flour for sorghum (couldn’t find at groceries or co-ops). So… had a few issues I’d love some suggestions to remedy:
        1. in the rising process, the dough rose too much. It was literally pouring over the edge of the pan, lots of dough. (1 packet red star yeast, about 102-108 while whisking & blooming).
        2.the crust is way too crunchy. Even though I set my oven temp lower (400 for first bake), it is like a rock. The inside is tasty, though!

        comments or suggestions?

        Thanks!

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Hi Kristen! Thanks so much for sharing your experience and feedback. We have not tried this recipe with an egg, but that might have affected the rising issue as well as the crunchy external texture. That said, this bread does have a fairly thick crust by nature. We’d suggest using the chia as recommended if you try the recipe again. Also, what size of pan did you use? The dough does fill up a standard loaf pan quite a bit, so perhaps a 9×5 would be better? Let us know if we can help any further!

          Reply
  14. Jillsays

    This is a great bread recipe. I followed the directions, using the metric quantities as I find I get better results when I weigh dry ingredients. I did follow the suggestions to do the initial bake at 400 degrees and loosely tented the bread during the last 20 minutes of baking. Our only issue was the step saying to “cool completely”. Always a difficult step to follow in our house!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Ah, yes, that step is always the most difficult in baking =p We’re so glad you enjoyed the recipe otherwise! xo

      Reply
      • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

        Hi Debra, Potato starch is key for a light and fluffy texture, but cornstarch would be the next best alternative. We haven’t tried with cornstarch though so can’t guarantee it will turn out the same. Let us know if you give it a try!

        Reply
  15. Julie Earlsays

    I have made this bread twice now and wow! It’s so incredible, we made it into your garlic bread last night and my 5 year old only ate bread for dinner and left no room for his red sauce and noodles! Both times I have made it the top comes out over cooked and burnt tasting though. We’ve just been cutting off the top and not eating it, but I’d love to know what I can adjust to not have to do this. I do think my oven bakes a little warm I just don’t know how much to adjust to ensure the loaf still gets fully baked. Wondering if I could create an aluminum foil tent over the top and put it on halfway through cooking to prevent burn? The rest of the loaf seems to be cooked perfectly which is why I’m nervous to change the oven temp.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re so glad you enjoy it, Julie! That should help! Or some readers have reported baking at 400 F vs. 425 F for a less crispy crust. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  16. Juliesays

    Do you happen to have the measurements by weight? I have much better luck with bread when I can weigh the flours!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Julie! If you look above the ingredients list you should see “US Customary – Metric”, if you click on “Metric” it should give you the ingredient amounts in grams and ml. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  17. Ellysays

    I tried this recipe as written, and it is some of the best gluten-free bread I have tried!! It is SO easy to make and reminds me of a homemade whole wheat bread. I will make this again.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re SO glad to hear it, Elly! Thank you for sharing your experience! xo

      Reply
  18. Pam S.says

    This was a wonderful recipe and will become a staple for me moving forward! It is very dense, but I love the texture. I made no changes. As the bread got older and a little dried out, I toasted it and it was delicious! My daughter started following you on Instagram and recommended you to me…what a find! THANK YOU for sharing all of your wonderful recipes!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Aw, thank you SO much for your kind words and lovely review, Pam! We are so glad you and your daughter enjoy our recipes! xoxo

      Reply
  19. Alicesays

    I finally made this today and loved it! Hands down it’s the best gluten free bread I have made. I substituted the Sorghum flour for Teff flour just because it’s what I had and it turned out perfect. Thank you so much for this great recipe :)

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re so glad you enjoyed it, Alice! Thank you for the lovely review and for sharing your modification! xo

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi, it’s necessary to activate the yeast. You could try a natural sweetener such as maple syrup. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  20. Terynsays

    I love this recipe! Is there any way to make it with a sourdough starter instead of packaged yeast? Sourdough starter adds a bunch of flavor and nutritional value!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Teryn, We haven’t yet created a recipe using a sourdough starter, but it’s possible you could use it here in place of some of the water, yeast, and brown rice flour. Perhaps 1-1/2 cups starter in place of the brown rice flour/yeast, then add an extra 1-1/2 cups water? You want to match the consistency of the dough in the video. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Hi Alex! The ground chia gets even more gelatinous and distributes more evenly than whole seeds, in our experience. Hope this helps!

          Reply
  21. Heathersays

    I followed to a T. Used all correct ingredients. However, when mixed together was pretty dry. I added a tbsp or two of water and that relaxed it a bit but was definitely not as wet as yours appears in the photo. Do you have any idea of why? Or, what to do in that situation?
    Also, when I took it out of the oven it would immediately fall out of the loaf pan like a hard brick. My serated knife can barely cut through it. The inside is soft and seems like how it should be but the outside is *too* crunchy it hurts my teeth a bit and I’m not confident on how it will be tomorrow.. Should I adjust temp or baking time?
    Otherwise, the taste is wonderful! And very easy to follow as this was my first attempt at yeast. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Heather, thank you for sharing your experience and sorry to hear it didn’t turn out quite right. Were you using the metric or US measurements? Were you using homemade or store-bought oat flour? Is it possible your brown rice flour was superfine? Those could also lead to variability in the batter consistency. Some readers have reported baking at 400 F initially for a slightly softer exterior. Hope that is helpful!

      Reply
      • Heathersays

        Thanks for your reply. I was using US measurements, store-bought oat flour and I’m not sure about the brown rice flour. It is the Bobs red mill brand.. the bag only says stone-ground it doesn’t mention anything about superfine or not. Should I experiment with a bit less next time?

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Hi Heather, store-bought oat flour could be the issue as it’s more finely ground than homemade and therefore will be more absorbent. We would suggest starting with slightly less next time to see if that helps!

          Reply
  22. Stephaniesays

    Truly THE BEST and EASIEST gluten free bread I’ve ever made. Super flavor. I make a weekly loaf, slice thin (19 pieces) and freeze to toast during the week. Thank you!!

    Reply
  23. Adriennesays

    I made this recipe recently with some modifications and it turned out great. Instead of the flour/starch combo listed, I used an equal amount of King Arthur gluten free all purpose flour, and instead of the ground chia, I used ground flax. Call this laziness, but the end result was delicious. I also crusted the top of the bread with everything bagel seasoning. It got great reviews from the guests at the dinner party!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Wonderful! Thanks so much for the lovely review and for sharing your modifications, Adrienne!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Yaminee, unfortunately that won’t work. Coconut flour is much more absorbent. We’d recommend sticking with the brown rice flour if at all possible!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi there! We haven’t tried this without potato starch and we aren’t sure if it will work. Using a starch is essential for giving the gluten-free bread the right structure, so the best starch to try instead of potato might be either corn starch or arrowroot, but we can’t guarantee results! Let us know how it goes!

      Reply
  24. Debbie Hendrickssays

    This was a very expensive loaf of bread to make. Not able to find ingredients locally so had to order on line. Thought this bread would be fun to make. Have followed this blog for several years too.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Oh no! Sorry to hear you didn’t have a good experience with this bread, Debbie. Did you make any modifications to the bread? We hope you enjoyed the end result of the gluten-free loaf, thanks for sharing your honest feedback!

      Reply
  25. Gigisays

    Hi!
    I have made this recipe several times. The last time I didn’t feel like taking the time to grind chia seeds. I substituted ground flax meal, which I keep in the freezer. I didn’t notice any difference in the results! The bread turned out just right!

    Reply
  26. Dafisays

    Hi, i would love to try this recipe but I don’t have Sorghum flour. Can I substitute it with oat flour or anything else?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Dafi, Sorghum usually subs well for oat flour, but we haven’t tried it in this recipe and breads can be finicky with flour swaps. Let us know if you try it!

      Reply
  27. Kelley Robertsonsays

    Hello! Made this and it smells delicious, but the only inconvenient thing was figuring out how to grind my chia seeds. It took over 5 minutes in my food processor. Would a coffee grinder be better? I’d love to know how you do this.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Kelley! We find that a coffee/spice grinder works well, or a high speed blender like a Vitamix! Hope this helps!

      Reply
  28. Kamilasays

    The GF bread recipe I was looking for for years! Thank you.
    One tiny problem I have is that it tends to bake with a cave inside. There is an air gap under the top crust. Pricking to top before backing seems to help, but I was wondering if you have ideas on how to eliminate the root cause.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Kamila! It sounds like your bread is probably over-proofed, so reducing the rise time should help with the gap inside. Perhaps try letting it rise in a cooler part of your house for 45 minutes instead of an hour? Let us know if that helps!

      Reply
  29. Tuisays

    This bread is so yummy. I’ve been looking for a gluten free bread that’s not only starches. After some hit and miss gluten free sourdough experiments, this was a much easier option. I subbed the sorghum for teff flour, and did half and half tapioca and potato starch (that’s what I had). I split it into 2 cast iron loaf pans, and it came out great. I was so happy with the result! Thanks

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hooray! We love to hear this. Thanks so much for the lovely review, Tui! So glad you enjoy the bread!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Christine! Potato starch is important here for binding as well as fluffiness, a starch like tapioca or arrowroot will probably be too gummy, but it’s possible that corn starch would work well here (though we haven’t tried it). Unfortunately some kind of starch is essential for holding the bread together. Let us know if you give any substitutions a try!

      Reply
  30. Christa B.says

    I made it just like it said and will probably stick with this as my easy go to GF bread! This was also my first try at making gluten-free bread so I am very pleased with the result! I eat off it for a few days and then I sliced the rest and froze the pieces in a Ziploc bag. I’ve eaten some of the frozen pieces since then after find them in the toaster and noticed the crust was softened a bit and made it pretty perfect for my taste. Thank you Minimalist Baker for the excellent recipe. :-)

    Two things I personally will do differently next time: reduce the oven temperature to 400 for the first part because the crispy crust was amazingly all over the entire bread but it was too hard for my preference, and, which was my mistake, I needed to let the dough prove a little more because the bottom was a little more dense than the rest of it. Our kitchen was pretty cold even though I used the proof setting in my oven.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re so glad to hear your first experience making gluten-free bread was a success! Thank you so much for sharing, Christa! xo

      Reply
  31. Sarasays

    Hi,

    I have hadn’t too much success preparing yeasted foods. When you get to the “let it rest for an hour in a warm place” step what exactly does that mean? How warm is warm? Can I use my oven turned super low to create the right atmosphere for the dough to rise?

    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Sara! Typically, 75 degrees or above is considered warm enough for proofing bread. If you prefer, you can put it in your oven but leave it off – as it is sometimes warmer than the counter. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  32. gail l youngsays

    I have been searching for such a bread for years and I made it three times and I enjoyed it but it was very hard to cut and tough. Can you please advise

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Gail, this one does have a crispier crust like a rustic, artisan bread. Some other readers have reported baking at 400 F vs. 425 F for a less crispy crust. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  33. Pandanasays

    I made this twice. The second time I put walnuts, pumpkin seeds, and dried cranberries. Umbelievably delicious. Thank you so much for sharing this recipe. Now I can eat bread again because it’s vegan and gluten free. Absolutely fantastic.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Ooooh, YUM! We will definitely have to try with those additions! Thank you for the lovely review! xoxo

      Reply
  34. Marinsays

    The claim is true…it simply is the BEST gluten free bread recipe! Believe me, I have made so many gluten free breads and this is by far the easiest and tastiest. What I love is that it is not heavy in texture and the ultimate bread test is to see if it holds up and can handle being made into sandwiches. It does! Crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside. It slices perfectly and does not crumble. What I love as well is that it does not taste eggy like so many other gluten free bread recipes out there. Even the following day, it was still soft and retained its texture (we had it wrapped in a tea towel & stored on kitchen bench). Allow it to cool completely & grease your bread tin REALLY well, as I didn’t use a non stick loaf pan & had a bit of difficulty getting it out. Perhaps I’ll try lining it with baking paper next time.

    Please please please create a hamburger bun recipe!!! Oh & a new pizza base recipe too.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Aw, we LOVE this, Marin! Thank you for sharing! Added both recipes to our ideas list =) Is there something in particular you’re looking for in the pizza crust that’s different from the two recipes we have (this and this)?

      Reply
      • Marinsays

        You’re welcome! I have tried both pizza recipes & prefer the first link mentioned, the second one comes up a bit dry. Since you have cracked the best gluten free bread loaf, I’m hoping you could create a bready/soft/crispy pizza crust recipe, that is thicker than most thin crust GF pizzas. I have confidence that you can work this out!

        Reply
  35. Rosesays

    So I made this again and used cornstarch instead of potato starch. I also went and got some sorghum so I was able to use the sorghum called for. I still substituted some of the starch for teff flour for a more whole grain loaf. It really had better texture inside, not gooey at all so thank you for teaching me about how different ingredients make a difference, maybe you will break me of my horrible habit of just substituting anything remotely similar. I will definitely make this again, it was easy and delicious. Still want to try and make a larger loaf sometime, need more of this :-)

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re so glad to hear it turned out well this time, Rose! Thank you for the updated review! xo

      Reply
    • Teresa Giordanosays

      I tried 2 times. Batter was so thick…not pourable. Are the dry ingredient measurements correct? What did I do wrong?

      Reply
      • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

        Hi Teresa! Can you tell us more about your experience? When the bread baked, did it bake correctly or was the final texture also incorrect?

        Reply
  36. Tiffanysays

    I’ve made this twice so far and have ingredients to make it again very soon. Best tasting gluten-free bread I’ve made… even better than ones I’ve purchased. Easy to make which is a plus.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      AMAZING! We’re so glad you enjoy it, Tiffany! Thank you for the lovely review! xo

      Reply
  37. Mogsays

    This truly is the BEST gluten free bread. I have already made it about 4 times now, following the recipe exactly as is and experimenting with tweaking the baking time and oven temperature. Baking in a cast iron loaf pan has allowed me to reduce the baking time significantly–to just 35 to 45 minutes in the oven at a steady 375 degrees. I have come to realize that I enjoy a softer versus crispier/harder crust and overall softer bread, so I skipped baking it at an initial 425 degrees due to my own personal preferences with texture. Thank you for sharing this excellent recipe!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Wonderful! Thanks so much for the lovely review and for sharing your modifications, Mog. We so appreciate it!

      Reply
  38. Alexasays

    I nearly didn’t make this bread, having tried a number of recipes and found them gritty in the mouth. And when I saw it needed sorghum flour (which I’d have to send for by post), I almost clicked away. I am so glad I didn’t! I love this bread – it reminds me of the one-rise-only loaf that I used to bake as a student in my wheat-eating days. It freezes wonderfully and can be used a slice or two at a time. On my second time of baking, I added three tablespoons of lightly toasted and ground-to-a-powder sesame seeds for additional calcium – delicious! Very grateful to have this in my repertoire – thank-you!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Woohoo! Thanks so much for the lovely review and for sharing your modifications, Alexa!

      Reply
      • Kimmiesays

        Hi there, I would like to try this bread recipe, it’ll be my first time making bread, never mind a gluten-free version. I have the saf quick yeast, and I’m wondering if I can substitute that instead of the regular yeast? I understand instead of proofing I would just add this into the dry mixture…?thx!

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Hi Kimmie, we haven’t tested it that way, but another reader mentioned using SAF quick yeast and added it the dry ingredients with success! Hope you love it!

          Reply
          • Kimmiesays

            Thank you so much for getting back to me, much appreciated. I did go through all the comments, I always learn so much! But somehow I missed that one. I will let you know how it goes.

  39. Tetianasays

    WOW!!! I made it and it’s the best gluten free bread I’ve ever tried. I wouldn’t even guess that it’s gluten free. Soft and delicious. And it was really easy to bake. The only question – is it possible to bake it a little bit less because the crust was really thick?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Woohoo! We’re so glad you think so, Tetiana! Some other readers have reported baking at 400 F vs. 425 F for a less crispy crust. Thank you for the lovely review! xo

      Reply
  40. Hadleysays

    Oh my word this is so good! I made it with Bob’s Red Mill and Arrowhead Mills flours and added a sprinkle of oatmeal on top. It was delicious and the texture is fantastic! It is also SO easy!! Will definitely become my go-to gluten free bread recipe! So far I’ve used it for hummus toast and toast with jam and I plan to make garlic bread next week. My only complaint is that it doesn’t get particularly toasty when toasted? It doesn’t maillard reaction much? Still super good though! And I’ve already passed the recipe on to my mom!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Amazing! We’re so glad you enjoy it, Hadley! We wonder if replacing the water with some avocado oil would help it get more toasty? Let us know if you try it out!

      Reply
      • Hadleysays

        I will definitely try that next time I make it! My previous go-to recipe (this one is way easier and the flavor is even better!) had a little vegan butter in it and I think that helped it get toasty?

        Reply
  41. Marysays

    Thanks for this great recipe! I made this and followed the recipe exactly as indicated and it came out perfect. This was great tasting, it holds it shape and is one of the best gluten-free recipes that I have tried. It toasts well too. This one is a keeper and I will have it as my go-to recipe.
    Thanks so much for sharing!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Yay! We’re so glad to hear you enjoy it, Mary! Thank you for the lovely review! xo

      Reply
  42. Gigisays

    I followed the directions exactly and this turned out very well. I couldn’t bring myself to buy a $7 loaf of gf bread at the store and now I can make my own at home. Thank you so much!
    I made a hummus and lettuce sandwich with it and also toast. I sliced it and put it in the freezer since I won’t go through the loaf before it is stale. It thaws quickly, or I just toast it.
    I only wish I had found this before summer tomato season ended.
    Thank you!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re so glad you enjoyed it, Gigi! Thank you for sharing your experience! Next time, would you mind leaving a star rating with your review? It’s super helpful for us and other readers. Thanks so much! xo

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Cathy! We haven’t tried this in a bread maker but if you can adjust the rise and bake times on your machine, it might work! Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
  43. Sheetusays

    Thanks a lot for such a wonderful recipe. Its a keeper. I finally made first ever GF vegan bread. The texture is nice and it tastes great. I baked it at 400/350.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Woohoo! We love to hear this. Thanks so much for the lovely review, Sheetu!

      Reply
  44. Tinasays

    I have made this twice, followed the recipe exactly, US measurements, and it was horrible. It looks NOTHING like the pics or video. Was not a “pourable batter” Dense, hard as a rock and didn’t even brown, looked gray. I really want to like this recipe and want it to look like these pics. What am I doing wrong??!! I’m trying one more time.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Oh no! We hate to hear that was your experience with it, Tina! Is it possible you’re using potato flour instead of potato starch? Or that some other flour got swapped? Or is your yeast not activating?

      Reply
  45. Marjoleinsays

    Hi!
    Ever since a friend recommended you, I’m an addict, and happy to be so!

    Quick question; can I replace the potato starch with corn starch?

    Thanks so much!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Aw, we’re so glad you’re enjoying our recipes, Marjolein! Potato starch is key for a light and fluffy texture, but cornstarch would be the next best alternative. We haven’t tried with cornstarch though so can’t guarantee it will turn out the same.

      Reply
  46. Jesssays

    Hello i am on my way to making this and was just curious what is the purpose of the chia seeds? Is this to bind the bread? Protein? I appreciate your time to answer :)

    Reply
  47. Dianesays

    Love this bread! I have made it a few times now. The first time I made it I couldn’t find sorghum flour so substituted cassava and have now tried both and it works with either. My crust was too crunchy, I had cuts in my mouth to prove it! So now I cook it on 425oF for 15 mins less. I also add the chia seeds without grinding them as it’s easier that way.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re so glad you enjoy it with some modifications, Diane! Thank you for sharing your great substitutions and experience with it – such helpful feedback!

      Reply
  48. Mackenziesays

    I made this bread and it was AMAZING the first day. I was so happy with it! But the next day it was really dry and almost inedible. I was wondering if you have any tips about the best way to store it. If not, I’ll have to eat the whole loaf on day one (which I’m not not opposed to doing 😉) I know GF bread is extremely fickle, so this is by no means a criticism of the recipe. XO

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Mackenzie, GF bread is fickle, but we find toasting it the next day softens this one up! We recommend storing in a sealed bag. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  49. Brittany Picksays

    When I mixed my wet ingredients into the dry ingredients, it definitely was not pourable or super sticky. Although some of it stuck to my wooden spoon, the consistency was more like regular dough. I skimmed through the comments but couldn’t find anyone else with this issue. I went ahead and added it to the greased pan to proof, and we’ll see how it turns out. For future reference, is there anything I can do in that step if that happens again? Or maybe something I can do earlier like a little bit more water? I followed the recipe and used the exact ingredients listed.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Brittany, we think it should be fine, but let us know how it bakes up! You can use a silicone spatula if it’s sticking to the wooden spoon. Did you use the metric or US measurements?

      Reply
      • Brittany Picksays

        Thank you for the quick response! Although it wasn’t as tall as other reviewers mentioned, the taste is great! Toddler tested and approved, and will definitely make it again! I used the US metric system, but it’s possible some of my flours were a bit over and maybe that’s what made it thicker? Not sure, but I’ll play around with it next time.

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          We’re so glad it turned out well! Thank you for the update, Brittany! You can definitely try scaling back on the flours a bit, but it’s okay if it’s not a pourable batter.

          Reply
  50. Kat Smithsays

    My husband and I are coeliac and can’t tolerate oats (which can be a problem for quite a few of us), can you recommend a substitute for the oat flour? Would buckwheat work maybe? Thank you. 😊

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Kat, we’d suggest additional sorghum flour – it tends to sub well for oat flour. Hope that helps!

      Reply
    • Marysays

      This really is the BEST! Sooooo good. Soft texture, outside a bit crisp. Yummy! I just need a slightly larger loaf pan because my bread rose up over to top and over the sides. Think it’s only a 4×7.

      Reply
      • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

        Yay! We’re so glad you enjoyed it, Mary! Thank you for sharing! You can definitely use a larger loaf pan. As a heads up – if it’s too large, the loaf won’t be as tall, so the slices will be smaller. Hope that helps!

        Reply
  51. Rose M Brownsays

    oh, duh! I just realized it said potato starch…I didn’t have any so used tapioca like I said in previous comment. Maybe that is why the gooey knife but in the past I always felt they were somewhat interchangeable. Anyway I can’t really eat nightshade and imagine potato starch is in that category so probably I’m stuck with the tapioca starch.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Thanks for sharing! Potato starch and tapioca tend to act quite differently (in our experience), perhaps you could try with corn starch next time, as it might be a bit closer to potato in texture/results!

      Reply
  52. Rose M Brownsays

    I love oatmeal in bread and was very excited to try this. I had to make a few substitutions. I used all brown rice for all but 1/4 cup of the sorghum since I was out of sorghum. I used about 1/2 or 3/4 (I can’t remember – sorry) of the tapioca starch and then used some brown teff flour in it’s place because I like my bread to be less refined.

    I was worried the the loaf would burn or at least get too dark since I bake a lot of gluten free bread and this recipe calls for a lot of heat, more than larger loaves that I make so I laid a piece of foil on top when I turned the temp down at 45 minutes.

    At first I was not wild about the flavor but what I noticed is that it actually improved over the days it sat on my counter and I slowly ate all of it. It was actually delicious by day 5 with avocado on it toasted. What I did not love about this is the gooey knife that I had every time I cut a slice. Maybe this was because it did not dry out enough due to being loosely covered with foil but honestly many of the loaves that I have made over the years with chia and/or psyllium have the same issue. It’s a pain to wash the knife every other slice. That said, will probably make again and not cover. Also, I noticed there is no oil in it, I wonder how it would be with a few TB of oil, or if I coated the top with oil before I baked since the crust was pretty tough and so also made cutting it a bit challenging?

    Also, I would prefer to make a larger loaf. Wondering if I did x1.25 the recipe, if there were any suggestions to adjust for baking a larger loaf?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Thanks so much for sharing your experience, Rose! We find that sorghum and starch are both helpful for creating a lifted and drier loaf, we don’t have experience with teff flour in bread so we aren’t sure if that contributed to textural issues. It’s also essential that you let it cool completely (even overnight) before slicing to help with gumminess. The crust is quite tough naturally, and we haven’t tried it with oil, but it might help! If you had a larger loaf pan it could work to increase the dough amount, but you would also need to increase your bake time by probably 10-20 minutes. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  53. Judysays

    Really easy to make and my gluten free friend said it was the best bread she had eaten for a very ling time. Could I use an egg instead of chia

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Woohoo! Love to hear this. We haven’t tried this with an egg and we aren’t sure if it would work, but it might! Let us know how it goes if you give it a try, Judy!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Michael, sugar is needed to activate the yeast. We don’t think monkfruit will do that, but let us know if you try it!

      Reply
  54. bob jsays

    I’m wondering if flax meal can be substituted for the ground chia seeds and what the results would be?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Bob, Flax isn’t usually as sticky as chia, and the dough might be a bit looser. We’d suggest keeping the water the same but adding 2 extra tablespoons of flax if you’re going to try the swap. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  55. Mayasays

    This is great! I have been making all the Cannelle et Vanille bread recipes which are also fantastic, but I love how easy this recipe is! I would up the salt to 2.5tsp next time to boost the flavor. I used my stand mixer which worked well, and let it rise for 45 minutes since it was getting big (even in my cold kitchen). I baked it at 400/350 since I’ve found my new oven is maybe kind of hot? Anyways, a good daily bread!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Wonderful! We’re so glad you enjoyed it! Thank you for sharing your experience, Maya! xo

      Reply
  56. Charlenesays

    I can’t eat rice or sorghum would it be possible for me to sub out all the flour in this recipe for coconut , almond , chickpea or cassava flour ?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Charlene, we aren’t sure without trying it ourselves! But brown rice and sorghum are pretty mild in flavor and less absorbent, so if you use coconut or chickpea, we’d suggest starting with less of them because they are quite absorbent and just know it will taste different.

      Reply
  57. Michelle Bridgemansays

    I am not sure why my yeast isn’t foaming. I tried multiple times and still nothing. What could be wrong here?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Michelle, a few ideas: 1) is your yeast expired?, 2) is the water too hot or too cold?, 3) are you using instant yeast vs. active dry?, 4) did you adjust the sweetener at all?

      Reply
  58. Lucianasays

    Thank you so much for sharing this recipe! It is indeed the best GF bread I’ve made so far. I encourage everyone to have a go. I couldn’t get sorghum flour so I used chick-peas flour and it worked nicely. I’ll make it again and again:)

    Reply
  59. Sabrina Rossisays

    I followed the recipe exactly and it turned out great. I was a bit worried at first because my batter was thicker than in the photo but it baked really nicely and I love the crispy crust and soft centre. I had no idea making my own bread could be this easy!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We’re so glad it turned out well, Sabrina! Thank you for sharing your experience! xo

      Reply
  60. Renukasays

    Hi! I would love to add some sliced black olives to this bread. At which stage do you suggest I add it in?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Love that idea! We’d suggest gently stirring them in in step 5 after you’ve thoroughly mixed the other ingredients. Let us know how it turns out!

      Reply
  61. De Upsonsays

    What if your flour already has a mixture of millet flour, rice flour, potato starch and sorghum flour? Do I only add oat flour to the mixture? I’m trying to make this now…

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi, without knowing the proportions of the ingredients in the blend, it’s hard to know if it will work! But you could try using it in place of all the flours and adding oat flour, then adjust the batter based on the texture in the photos/video. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  62. Tessasays

    I made this bread last weekend and I was excited to make my own GF bread. I followed the recipe to a tee and the crust of the bread came out super hard. Like a rock. I wasn’t sure I was going to be able to cut through it, but I did and the inside was a beautiful texture.

    My family ate the whole loaf over a few days. Any recommendations on how to get the crust a bit softer?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Tessa, we’re so glad your family enjoyed it! The outside of the bread should be crusty like a nice rustic loaf! If you’d like it softer, you could try baking at a lower temperature instead, but we haven’t tried it that way and aren’t certain how it would turn out. Hope that helps!

      Reply
    • Michelesays

      General bread baking tip to soften thick crust for gluten bread is to wrap loaf in a tea towel immediately upon removing from oven to cool—will slightly steam crust, haven’t tried on this gf loaf, but should help!

      Reply
  63. Sakshi Sainisays

    I tried this recipe last night. I substituted potato starch with arrowroot flour. And jaggery for cane sugar. My bread turned out a bit too hard on the outside albeit I did leave it overnight to cool. The inside was moist and yummy. The loaf was quite heavy overall. It was difficult to slice. Is it meant to be? Mine also didn’t rise much after it went into the oven. It did rise during the 1 hour sitting time outside. Any tips?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Sakshi, potato starch is key for a light and fluffy texture so assuming your loaf proofed nicely, the arrowroot is likely why the bread was heavy. The exterior should be crusty, but easy to slice with a serrated knife. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  64. Emiliasays

    so. I did not really have the correct ingredients, but still gave it a try:
    – Coconut Sugar instead of reg sugar
    – 1/4 Cup + 2Tbsp ground flax seeds instead of ground chia seeds
    – Buckwheat instead of rice flour
    – teff flour instead of sorghum flour

    a bit on the dry side but the clostest gf bread to “normal” bread that I have ever tasted! superb crust!

    2 questions:
    – what are your thoughts on Teff?
    – i cant find ground chia seeds. was thinking about using non ground chia seeds. do you think that would work?

    Many thanks!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Emilia, that’s great to hear it still turned out well with the modifications! We’re thinking the teff and/or buckwheat likely made it more dry. We typically grind chia seeds in either a blender or spice grinder. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  65. Lauriesays

    I made this yesterday and it came out great! It was fairly easy too. It tastes a lot more like real bread than most of the GF ones I buy – only I forgot the salt. Thanks so much for this recipe!

    Reply
  66. Bobbisays

    I’ve been gluten free since mid 90’s. I’ve tried seemingly every gf bread recipe. This is so far superior to any other I’ve tried that I plan to experiment no more!
    Now that I have all my ingredients and don’t need to grind my sorghum nor rice flour, bread baking will be a breeze.
    I too had excess batter and made 2 mini loafs (bonus) but will try to get all the batter in next time. I was afraid it might rise more on the oven and overflow.
    Thank you so much for all your recipes. This is the crown jewel, imo. I’m so basic and limited when it comes to meals that I usually stick to fruits, salads, and beans + greens + brown rice in some configuration.
    I followed your suggestion to slice then freeze. This kept me from eating too much (that temptation is the only downside of this loaf) so now I’ve enjoyed it over a week’s time, a couple of slices a day.
    This is my first time commenting on any recipe. Just had to!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Amazing! We really appreciate such a glowing review from a gluten-free pro! So glad you’re enjoying the bread, Bobbi!

      Reply
      • Traci Murphysays

        I made this bread. Spooned each flour in to measuring cups. Proofed my yeast. Everything went well. It rose nicely…then fell somewhere in the process. Result a dense loaf. Any suggestions?

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Hi Traci, sorry to hear that happened! Did you make any modifications? What type of yeast did you use? This article has some ideas to troubleshoot what else could have gone wrong.

          Reply
  67. Sara Peytonsays

    Oh my gosh! I am sooo excited! This turned out amazing! I followed the directions exactly and it turned out wonderfully!

    Reply
  68. Lorisays

    I made this. The batter turned out very soupy for me. Further, the bread absolutely burned within the initial 45 min of baking before even turning down the temp. Are there modifications I should be making for 5000 ft elevation? Hoping to make this work!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Oh no! So sorry to hear this, Lori! If you used all the correct ingredients the dough shouldn’t be too loose, but it is much thinner than a typical bread dough, so you can watch the recipe video to see what it should look like. For the bake time, we’d suggest reducing it by ~15 minutes and checking it. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  69. Catherinesays

    This is straight up the BEST GF bread I’ve ever tried! I’ve had to cut out gluten and eggs from my diet recently due to intolerance and this recipe is literally a life saver. It tastes exactly like a delicious whole grain bread, has amazing texture, and is super sturdy. So far, my fav way to eat it is toasted with smashed avocado, sprinkle of black pepper, and a fresh slice of homegrown tomato. Seriously HEAVEN. I can only imagine how amazing it’d be with an over easy egg, ugh!

    One question I have is about the cane sugar -Do you think it’d be possible to sub in raw honey or coconut sugar? I’m supposed to be limiting cane sugar, so curious if any alternatives would work?

    Thanks for always making awesome alternative recipes!! 💗✨

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We love to hear this! SO happy you are able to enjoy this bread, Catherine! Honey typically does work well in place of cane sugar, but the yeast may not foam as much. Maple syrup and coconut sugar also technically work, but not as well as honey in our experience. Hope this helps, thanks so much for the lovely review!

      Reply
  70. Wendysays

    This bread was absolutely delicious! I used the exact ingredients from the recipe. When I raised it an hour, it raised so much that some of the edges fell off (oh no!) so I had to clean the bread pan before I put it in the oven. It stuck a little on the top edges but I was able to get it out .
    Best thing, it tastes like wonderful yeast bread with a lovely crunchy crust. Thanks, Dana!!!😀

    Reply
  71. nancysays

    Hi, I got your reply about the baking time (via email) and can’t see where it is here in the train of messages, but thank you!
    there was so much batter, I had to put some of it in a mini loaf pan, and that loaf was a little overdone,
    but my husband said the regular-sized loaf pan’s bread was good!
    I only cooked it on 400 not 425, but we liked it,
    how did I get so much batter?
    I also didn’t grind the chia, is that necessary?
    thank you!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Nancy, Glad to hear you liked it! Grinding the chia seeds helps with binding and absorbs more of the liquid. You can use a larger loaf pan for next time if you want, but just know the bread won’t be as tall.

      Reply
  72. Nancysays

    Hi, 425 F for 45 minutes, then turn the oven down to 375 F (190 C) for 30 minutes. really? that’s a long time for a loaf of bread to bake. it came out very hard (and I actually only started w/ 400 not 425).

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Nancy, the exterior should be crusty like a nice rustic bread, and the inside should be perfectly cooked through. We find it needs to cook for a long time because gluten-free bread can be gummy on the inside otherwise. How was it when you sliced it open?

      Reply
    • Jamilasays

      Hi there,
      I would love to try this recipe. What’s a good substitute for potatoe starch as I am allergic to potatoes.

      Many thanks

      Reply
      • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

        Hi Jamila! We haven’t tried this without potato starch, so we aren’t sure if it would work, but we think corn starch would be the best substitute to try!

        Reply
  73. Nidhi patwardhansays

    Hi, I have a gluten free sourdough starter ,could you please guide how I can use it instead of yeast. Thanks

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Nidhi, We haven’t yet created a recipe using a sourdough starter, but it’s possible you could use it here in place of some of the water, yeast, and brown rice flour. Perhaps 1-1/2 cups starter in place of the brown rice flour/yeast, then add an extra 1-1/2 cups water? You want to match the consistency of the dough in the video. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Rita, unfortunately stevia won’t work because you need some sort of sugar to activate the yeast. Maple syrup should work!

      Reply
  74. Snehasays

    Excited to try this!

    I only have superfine brown rice flour – is that okay to use in place of regular brown rice flour? Thanks.

    Reply
      • Snehasays

        This bread was phenomenal. Perfectly crusty on the outside, soft on the inside. I used superfine brown rice flour, coconut sugar instead of white sugar, and I wasn’t able to grind the chia seeds this time, but I’ll try it next time. This is going into my regular rotation. Thank you for a great recipe (and I’m so glad it doesn’t have psyllium husk powder since that gives me a stomachache).

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Woohoo! We love to hear this. Thanks so much for the lovely review! So glad you enjoyed!

          Reply
  75. Amy Josays

    I’ve baked bread weekly for last few years, but had to cut out gluten recently. To be honest, I don’t think I’ve ever tried any other GF bread, so I don’t have much to compare this to, but this bread is excellent!!! I really like the crispy crust, and the interior is pleasantly dense but not at all stodgy. Just really good!

    The recipe was clear and easy to follow. I use SAF instant yeast for my baking, so just added that in with the dry ingredients (same amount as dry active yeast), and it turned out just fine. Pleasantly yeasty, and makes a mean slice of toast! Looking forward to adding this to my regular baking routine. Thanks for putting this recipe out — it arrived in my inbox just when I needed it! :-)

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Yay! Thanks for giving it a try and leaving such a lovely review, Amy Jo! We’re so glad you enjoy it! xo

      Reply
  76. Ana Pacheco Lobo Loureirosays

    Loved the recipe! But used the ‘Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour’ and didn’t know how to do the measurements. How would you recommend to measure it?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Ana! I’m not sure I understand your question, are you using the Bob’s flour in place of all the flours or just one?

      Reply
      • Anasays

        The ‘Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour’ in place of all flours, since it consists on sweet rice and brown rice flour, potato starch, sorghum flour, tapioca flour and xanthan gum.

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Hm, we’re not sure it will have the same texture as the proportions of the ingredients in the blend are likely different from those in this recipe and the addition of tapioca might change it too. But perhaps 3 1/4 – 3 3/4 cups flour?

          Reply
  77. Chantalsays

    Hi! Some of the US measurements to metric conversions are off. For example, does the recipe require 2 cups of water or 240ml of water? I made this bread yesterday with 2 cups of water, but it might have been better with less water. My dough overflowed from the bread pan when baking. Some of the dry ingredients were off as well. I measured and weighed everything to compare and proceeding with an average when there was a big enough difference. Otherwise, it’s a good GF egg-free bread recipe that could easily be adapted for anyone that can’t consume oat flour. Next time, I’ll reduce the water by a bit and the potato starch by at least 1/4 cup and increase one of the flours by 1/4 cup.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Thanks for bringing this to our attention, Chantal! We’re glad to hear you enjoyed it overall! We’ve updated the water metric – 2 cups is the correct amount. Since we’re US-based, we typically convert (using information available from Bob’s Red Mill or other brands of flours we use) vs. weighing the flours. But for this specific recipe we knew it would be especially important, so we made sure to measure in grams. We’ll double check and see if we can make any improvements, but please let us know if there are specific measurements you felt were off.

      Reply
    • Michelesays

      Use the measurements as a guide, then adjust to match the detailed descriptions, photos, videos. How much water depends on freshness of your grains, whether refrigerated, the air humidity —dryer grain needs more hydration, fresh grains on a rainy day will use much less water—every time you bake bread it may differ!! Keep trying, because when you get it right you will be able to recognize the right texture in the dough yourself—and feel so great!

      Reply
  78. Cathysays

    This was fantastic and easy. I didn’t really think it would work but it did. Substituted more oat flour for sorghum flour. Very nice texture. Thanks!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Woohoo! We’re so glad you enjoyed it, Cathy! Thank you for the lovely review and for sharing that modification! xo

      Reply
  79. Katarinasays

    I can’t wait to try this! Any ideas for substitutions on the sorghum flour? I can’t seem to find it anywhere near me (though I may end up just ordering online).

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Katarina! The sorghum is quite important here for structure and flavor, and we haven’t tried this recipe without it yet. It’s possible you could have success by increasing the rice, oat, and potato by 1/4 cup each to compensate, but we aren’t sure if it would work. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Kristinsays

      OMG. This is the best bread ever!!! I have gotten so tired of gluten free bread falling apart the second it is used for a sandwich or the grainy texture or the cardboard texture……. Not this bread. It is sooooo good. Tastes like a nice multigrain bread. Even my oldest son preferred that bread over the Italian bread we had for the gluten tolerant. Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing this recipe and figuring out how all the ingredients go together and make a really great bread!!

      Reply
      • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

        That’s AMAZING – we’re so glad you and your family enjoy it, Kristin! Thank you so much for the lovely review! Next time, would you mind leaving a star rating with your review? It’s super helpful for us and other readers. Thanks so much! xo

        Reply
    • Christinesays

      I really like the texture of sorghum flour, plus, it’s lectin free. I got my flour on Amazon:
      Rani Juwar (Sorghum) Flour 4lb (64oz) 4 Pound Bulk

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Aida! We haven’t tried this with white rice flour but we don’t think it would work, white rice flour tends to be much more sticky and would not create the same results. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  80. Delfinasays

    I don’t readily have sorghum flour on hand. Is there another flour I can substitute it with, or would eliminating the sorghum affect the end result of this bread recipe?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Delfina! Unfortunately the sorghum is quite important here both for structure and flavor. It’s possible you could increase the rice and oat flour to make up for the sorghum, but we haven’t tried it and aren’t sure what will happen. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
  81. Maggiesays

    Thank you Thank you Thank you🤗 Of all the commercial breads and on line recipies I’ve tried this is the only one that has great structure and great flavor. I’d just about given up when this one popped up today. I made it immediately and am so pleased. I’m going to try making buns. I so miss a good burger.
    You’ve made my life so much happier😊

    Reply
  82. Linda Igelmundsays

    Have you adapted any of your bread recipes to a Gluten Free Sourdough starter ?? My GF starter is finally working and I’m looking for bread recipes to bake with it.
    Thanks
    Linda I

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Linda! We haven’t yet created a recipe using a sourdough starter, but it is possible you could use it here in place of some of the water, yeast, and brown rice flour. Perhaps 1-1/2 cups starter in place of the brown rice flour/yeast, then add an extra 1-1/2 cups water? You want to match the consistency of the dough in the video. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Gal! We haven’t tried this without yeast and unless you have some type of starter (like a gluten free sourdough starter) it will probably not work. The yeast is necessary for creating lift, airiness, and a classic bread taste, without it you will probably end up with a very dense, cake-like result. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  83. Diannesays

    Will be trying this. Refeshing to see a recipe for bread with out psyllium its a very allergy making product and I avoid it at all cost. Love Chia seeds. Thanks for posting.

    Reply
  84. Maren Ahlbergsays

    What could I sub for the rice flour? I have a GF daughter who also has a rice sensitivity– such a tough combo! Looking forward to trying this!

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Maren, We haven’t tried this recipe without the rice flour and we don’t know if it would work. You could possibly try adding more sorghum in place of it, or maybe buckwheat if you don’t mind the flavor. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  85. Suzannesays

    I have to be careful with candida so avoid yeast… do you have a recipe without yeast? Thank you – I love your recipes, am always telling my friends, and turn to them all the time

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Christina! We haven’t tried it but we think it should work. 1 medium egg should be good! Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
    • Emilysays

      Let me say this is the best tasting gluten free bread I’ve ever had!!! I used an egg instead of chia and it worked great! The only problem is the bread stuck to my pan really bad, even with the oil and dusting with flour, so I ended up eating it in chunks lol! Would parchment paper work with this dough to ensure it doesn’t stick??

      Reply
      • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

        Yay! We’re so glad you enjoyed it, Emily! We’re thinking the egg might have made it stick. Parchment should work great!

        Reply
  86. William Gregorysays

    Can the rice flour be substituted for something else? I’m thinking of my daughter, she’s rice and gluten intolerant. Thanks.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi William! We haven’t tried this recipe without the rice flour and we don’t know if it would work. You could possibly try adding more sorghum in place of it, or maybe buckwheat if you don’t mind the flavor. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  87. STEPHANIE GREENEsays

    I’ve heard the GF bread needs xanthan gum in order to duplicate the elasticity and stretchy rise performed by the gluten in wheat. What is giving your bread that stretch?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Stephanie! The chia seeds help give structure and stretch here, as well as the combination of flours and their protein content. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Loretta! We haven’t tried this with eggs yet but we think it would work to use 1 egg in place of the chia. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      We haven’t tried this recipe in a bread maker and we aren’t sure if it would work. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
  88. Jennifer Doylesays

    Looks good…anything I could substitute for oat flour? We’re still trying to avoid it our newly diagnosed celiac son but would love to try this out.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Jennifer! We haven’t tried this without the oat flour and it is quite important. You could try increasing the sorghum by 1/2 cup and possibly adding 1/4 cup of something like almond flour or chickpea flour for structure, but we cannot guarantee results. Let us know how it goes if you try any substitutions!

      Reply
  89. Alenesays

    I cannot eat rice at all. Is there something that I can substitute for the rice? Or is it too important to the recipe to change? Thank you.

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Alene! We haven’t tried this bread without the brown rice flour and we aren’t sure if it will work… You could possibly try increasing the sorghum flour but it might not give it enough structure, maybe buckwheat if you don’t mind the flavor! Let us know if you end up trying any substitutions!

      Reply
      • Alenesays

        Believe it or not, I got arsenic poisoning! From rice. I may try it with a combination of other flours to make up for no rice. Maybe cassava and increase the sorghum a little. I will let you know. Since I got rid of everything containing rice flour, I made a bread recipe with Bob’s Red Mill grain free flour. I thought it was good, but my non gluten free husband was not a fan. I’m going to look at those ingredients again and see what it’s made of. Maybe I can cut and paste, lol! Thank you for your quick reply. I have been frantic, both about the diagnosis and throwing out tons of stuff.

        Reply
  90. Feysays

    I only have instant yeast. Do you think it will work if I use instant yeast mixed with the flours instead of dry yeast?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Fey! We haven’t tried this with instant yeast, but it might work! Let us know how it goes!

      Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Hi Sinem! The sorghum flour is quite important here for flavor and structure, but it’s possible you could have success by increasing all the rice, oat and potato portions by 1/4 cup. We haven’t tried it though, so we cannot guarantee results. Hope this helps!

          Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Katrina! We haven’t tried this bread with psyllium husk, but it should work. If you are using the whole version you could probably do 1/4 cup, but if you are using psyllium husk powder we’d suggest using 2 Tbsp. Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply
      • Katrinasays

        I made this with the ground psyllium yesterday and it turned out incredible! I did have to add extra water, but that’s likely because I’m baking at high altitude. The end result was delicious, moist, & springy, just like normal bread! Thank you for this spectacular recipe & for answering my question so thoroughly!

        Reply
        • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

          Yay! We’re so glad it turned out well, Katrina! Thank you for the lovely review and reporting back on the modification! xoxo

          Reply
  91. Suzette Somciosays

    Unfortunately, all the ingredients are red flags in my Food Intolerance Test (FIT). Starting with yeast. All the flours as well. So sad!

    Reply
  92. Sandysays

    This looks amazing! I’m wondering if anything can be substituted for the potato starch – we have a potato intolerance in the family?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Sandy! We haven’t tried it ourselves, but it is possible that tapioca or corn starch could work in place of the potato. They are slightly different but it might do the job. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Taylor! Flax isn’t usually as sticky as chia, and the dough might be a bit looser. We’d suggest keeping the water the same but adding 2 extra tablespoons of flax if you’re going to try the swap. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Sharea! We haven’t tried this with date syrup, but it might work! If the yeast/water mixture isn’t foamy after ~10 minutes it might not be effective, but coconut sugar or maple syrup are some other options that could work instead. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Lisa! If you can have coconut sugar or maple syrup, those should work here, as some type of sugar is required to help the yeast proof. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  93. ASsays

    Would love to try this but I’d have to use egg due to a seed allergy — how many would you suggest swapping for the chia seed?

    Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi there! We haven’t tried this with an egg yet but it should work, we’d suggest using 1 egg in place of the chia seeds! Let us know how it goes!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Joanna! The sorghum flour is pretty important for creating the right structure and a pleasant nutty taste in this bread, and we haven’t tried a substitution yet. It’s possible that buckwheat, or a mix of oat and brown rice flour, could work in place of the sorghum (but the results won’t taste the same). Let us know how it goes if you try any substitutions!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Bella! We found that cane sugar did the best job of activating the yeast here, but coconut sugar or maple syrup should work as well. Hope this helps!

      Reply
    • Support @ Minimalist Bakersays

      Hi Beverly! We haven’t tried this with an egg and we aren’t sure if it would work, but it should! Let us know how it goes if you give it a try!

      Reply